Chicken and Egg Issue 12 - page 58-59

58
59
Chicken & Egg. Welfare and Food Together.
Chicken & Egg. Welfare and Food Together.
Samantha Chubbock has used our Advice
Line on a few occasions and values the help
she has received for her beloved hens; she
has subsequently donated £2 per month to
support the facility since 2015. We asked her
what the Advice Line meant to her:
How did you first hear about the work of
the BHWT?
I was doing research in preparation for
getting my first hens when I came across the
BHWT. I have always preferred to re-home
animals in need of a good home rather than
buying those specifically bred for sale so the
work of the charity immediately appealed
to me. Having now experienced the joys of
rehoming ex-bats, I will never do anything
else whilst there are girls in need of a loving
home.
Why did you decide to donate to the BHWT
through via a small monthly gift?
I have been very impressed with the work
of the charity and any contact I have had
with them from the outset. Obviously there
is a limit to the number of hens I can help
directly so I chose to support the BHWT to
help as many girls as possible and their work
to raise awareness and improve conditions
Advice line
appeal
Gaynor Davies, our dedicated Head of Ops, has been
answering your hen health queries for more than two years
now, and we know that you always appreciate her help when
it’s needed. Gaynor’s role is ever growing within the charity
and in order to maintain our Advice Line for supporters we
are now seeking to train more staff so we can give advice on
the spot, when you call, when it’s most needed.
for even more. I have also found the Hen
Advice Line to be essential and want to
help make sure this service continues to
be available in the future. I have been
completely won over by the joys of chickens
and thank the BHWT for all they do to help
them.
Alicia Forsyth contacted Gaynor about her hen, Clove’s, particularly red face. Alicia told Gaynor
that Clove’s redness fluctuated throughout the day and was generally much redder than the
other hens. There could be a number of reasons for this, including a temperature issue and/
or reaction to a shock (such as an unexpected noise), however, the most likely reason was the
fact that Clove was in full lay, whilst the other hens were not (hence their paler combs). Maybe
Clove was simply blushing at her success in producing another tasty gift for Alicia!
Being able to talk issues through with someone on the end of the phone is very important to
our supporters, so please support our Advice Line where you can.
Smantha Chubbock and friend
1...,38-39,40-41,42-43,44-45,46-47,48-49,50-51,52-53,54-55,56-57 60-61,62-63,64-65,66-67,68
Powered by FlippingBook